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Friday, December 12, 2008

Mumbai After The Smoke Has Cleared

On Monday most of Mumbai, India attempted a return to normal activity, in the wake of the 60-hour-long siege last week. Some facts about the attacks are a bit clearer now, others still hazy. Based in part on the confessions of the only terrorist captured alive - Azam Amir Kasav (also identified elsewhere as 'Ajmal Qasab'), Indian officials now say that there were only 10 gunmen involved, all members of Lashkar-e-Taiba, a Pakistani militant group with links to the disputed Himalayan region of Kashmir - though Pakistan officially denies any involvement. According to recent reports, the ten attackers were responsible for the deaths of 172 people, including 19 foreigners, and 239 wounded. While mourners of the victims attended to their loved ones, and people all over the world held vigils, a Muslim graveyard in Mumbai refused to bury the nine dead gunmen - an official saying that they were not true followers of the Islamic faith.

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An Indian soldier stands guard outside the Taj Mahal Palace & Tower Hotel following an armed siege on November 29, 2008 in Mumbai, India.


Photographers and members of the media cover a gunfire at the Taj Hotel in Mumbai November 28, 2008. At the front of the Taj, bleary-eyed journalists who had earlier mobbed National Security Guards chief J.K. Dutt when he announced the end of the siege were pushed back roughly behind a rope that had marked an unofficial boundary for them. Hundreds of media workers dived for cover as stray bullets whistled above them during the final stages of a firefight.


Indian commandos stand on a balcony of the Taj Mahal Palace & Tower Hotel after they gained control of it, on November 29, 2008 in Mumbai, India.


The lobby area of the Taj Mahal Hotel is seen in Mumbai, India, Saturday, Nov. 29, 2008, shortly after Indian commandos killed the last remaining gunmen holed up at the luxury Mumbai hotel Saturday.


Security officials survey a destroyed room inside the Taj Mahal Palace & Tower Hotel after the armed siege on November 29, 2008 in Mumbai, India.


A policeman, shot at five times, holds up his metal belt buckle which saved his life on November 29, 2008 in Mumbai, India.


Interiors of Nariman House, Mumbai headquarters of the ultra-Orthodox Chabad Lubavitch movement, are seen after the commando operation in Mumbai, India, Saturday, Nov. 29, 2008.


Muslims release pigeons symbolising peace during a rally in the western Indian city of Ahmedabad against the Mumbai attacks November 29, 2008.


Policemen and their families attend a meeting to pay tributes to Mumbai's policemen, in photographs in background, who lost their lives in terrorist attacks in Mumbai, India, Sunday, Nov. 30, 2008.


Dhole Deepk, a policeman who was wounded at the Taj Mahal Palace & Tower Hotel during the armed siege with militants that ended yesterday, is seen at the Mumbai hospital, on November 30, 2008.


Mumbai Residents walk with candles in the street near The Oberoi Hotel during a demonstration against the recent terror attacks in the city on November 30, 2008 in Mumbai, India.


Forensic experts sit outside the Nariman House Jewish centre, which is guarded by police, at Colaba Market on November 30, 2008 in Mumbai, India.


A boy attends a candle lighting ceremony in Mumbai, India on Sunday, Nov. 30, 2008.


A woman cries, during a candlelight march for the victims of the Mumbai terrorist attack in which more than 195 people were killed, in Mumbai, India, Saturday, Nov. 29, 2008.


People wait on the platforms of the landmark Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus train station, one of the several places where the attackers shot at people, in Mumbai, India, Monday Dec. 1, 2008. Mumbai returned to normal Monday to some degree, with many shopkeepers opening their doors for the first time since the attacks began. As authorities finished removing bodies Monday from the bullet and grenade-scarred Taj Mahal hotel, a Muslim graveyard refused to bury the nine gunmen who terrorized this city over three days last week, leaving at least 172 people dead and wreaking havoc at some of its most famous landmarks.


Manoj Kanojia, 27, cries as he speaks to his mother on the phone at a hospital in Mumbai, India, Saturday, Nov. 29, 2008. Manoj suffered two bullet wounds in Wednesday's shooting at the Chhatrapati Shivaji Train Station in Mumbai.


An Indian commando signs autographs for a crowd of grateful people in Mumbai November 29, 2008.


Muslims pay homage to the victims of the Mumbai attacks during a special prayer meeting at a mosque in the northeastern Indian city of Siliguri November 29, 2008.

sebutir kata:
Muslim graveyard in Mumbai refused to bury the nine dead gunmen - an official saying that they were not true followers of the Islamic faith.

Statement diatas terpaksa dikeluarkan demi menyelamatkan umat Islam yang lain yang masih hidup dibumi minoriti Islam.. apalagi yang boleh dilakukan bagi yang hidup.. tak terpikiaqkah mereka apa bakal berlaku pada minoriti Islam yang lain setelah mereka menunaikan hajat mereka yang didakwa syahid.. aku belajaq hukum bukan untuk orang lain, aku menghukum diri sendiri.. bukan niat nak hukum syahid depa..

Terbela kah umat Islam selepas ini..
Bersinarkah syiar Islam selepas ini..
Terangkat lagikah martabat Islam selepas ini..

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